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Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
, from alternative tobacco products, we turn to alternative energy. in the world of energy, the holy grail is a power source that's inexpensive and clean with no emissions. many start-ups in silicon valley are working on it. and one of them is bloom energy. they want to put a little power plant in a box literally in your backyard. for nearly a decade, the company had been unusually secretive about its bloom box. but in february 2010, its inventor, k.r. sridhar, invited me to take a look inside his much talked about but never before seen creature. what could this power? >> this could power a u.s. home. average united states home. >> entire house? >> entire house, 24/7, 365. >> something that small? >> the way we make it is in two blocks. this is a european home. the two put together is a u.s. home. >> [chuckling] 'cause we use twice as much energy, is that what you're saying? >> yeah, and this will power four asian homes. >> so four homes in india, your native country. >> absolutely. four to six homes in our country. >> it sounds awfully dazzling. >> it is real. it works. >> he says h
about america's energy, economy and environment. i'm greg dalton. in 1988, nasa scientist james hansen told a congressional hearing that it was 99% certain that burning fossil fuels was heating the earth's atmosphere. the next day, a new york times headline proclaimed, quote, global warming has begun, expert tells senate. a quarter century later, dr. hansen and other scientists are still striving to convince much of the united states that basic scientific observation -- seas are rising, glaciers are disappearing, floods are increasing. humans are the cause. about half of americans now accept that fact, 40% do not, according to gallup. over the next hour, we will discuss climate science communication, public policy and opinion, with james hansen and our live audience here at the commonwealth club of california in san francisco. today, dr. hansen is receiving the 2012 stephen schneider award for outstanding climate science communication bestowed by climate one. stephen schneider was a pioneering scientist at stanford who was involved in the formation of climate one that which is a sustai
about wind energy that needs to be sunsetted, soon. you bring up the side of the cliff that no one talks about. the sequester, the automatic spending reduction, i don't think it would be a bad thing if washington took the sequester and showed that they could cut spending. >> because we have a never budget balancing act going on with the journalist pointed out the secret gang of six meetings, that's budgeting by, secret gang of 12 meetings. and-- >> quickly that's what we use today call blue smoke and mirrors in washington and that's why people are upset at washington. don't trust them. david: good to see you. well, the numbers are in and you were not shopping as much as last year, apparently. holiday retail sales were basically unchanged from last year and sandy, of course, and the connecticut shooting got some blame, but what about no jobs and no money? coming up, the opening bell, futures are up. [ indistinct shouting ] ♪ [ indistinct shouting ] [ male announcer ] time and sales data. split-second stats. [ indistinct shouting ] ♪ it's so close to the options floor... [ indistinct s
as to develop the unconventional fossil fuels because they're dirtier, you get less energy per unit carbon and you get all these other pollution, regional pollution. so we need to try to talk common sense into them and we've -- you know, we've done -- i've been arrested in the front of the white house because of the tar sands. and there are more and more people who are willing to stand up and protest against those. and i know i sound like a broken record, but just -- and i've realized that just trying to block an individual carbon source, although that's meritorious, it won't work if we don't have a price on carbon. >> yeah. and china will just -- all right. we're gonna invite your participation and, particularly, if you haven't had a chance to ask a question. and i'm gonna be assertive about -- i'm encouraging you to be brief and get to your question so we can get as many people to participate as possible. the line starts with our producer jane ann right there, and then i welcome your comments for dr. hansen. let's invite the audience participation. yes, welcome to climate one. >> thank y
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of a glorious past. and some parts of the city bustle with holiday energy. but not far away: closed-up storefronts. and, further below the surface, this: a health clinic set up by the greek branch of the international aid group, doctors of the world to serve the country's newly poor. dr. nikitis kanakis is its director. >> brown: kanakis group, in fact, had to cut back some of its work in africa because of the needs at home. here in perama, unemployment tops 50% as the shrinking economy has crippled much of the local shipping industry. at the same time, the deeply indebted greek government has made dramatic budget cuts, including to health benefits. the combination has left many here without access to private or public care. and that's meant a stunning rise in disease and mortality rates. >> brown: economists, of course, speak of a different kind of necessary medicine: the kind a deeply indebted nation must take. the price for living and consuming well beyond its means for far too long. >> the medicine is necessary. it was, though, delivered very abruptly. >> brown: as a government
can sell any remaining stocks in stores. congress decided to stop using them for more energy efficient ones. >> 90% of energy that the bulb generates is wasted. so what they replace them with are more energy efficient bulbs that are just as bright, just as good and will actually save you money over the long run. >> traditional 60 and 40 watt bulbs will go away in 2014. you can buy compact bulbs or l.e.d. bulbs. >> just hours before lawmakers are out of time on averting the so-called fiscal cliff. let's check in with hampton pearson who has more on that and the rest of the business. >> we have the markets in a narrow trading range keyed in on fiscal cliff talks. hours now for lawmakers to avoid going over the fiscal cliff. the dow is up barely less than two points at 12939. the nasdaq up 18 points. the s & p is up four. congress may be able to skirt the dairy cliff. the house and agriculture committees are set to extend the farm bill to keep milk prices from surging. it would keep a long dormant milk subsidy coming back to life pushing milk over $6 more than twice the national average.
grassroots energy that got them out. i think college students were a big part of the win for prop 30. the fact that the current year's budget was built assuming that 30 was going to pass and that if it didn't, there were going to be trigger cuts that were going to cut into the higher education budget, really motivated a lot of students out. so, brown moves forward with that momentum. >> i really feel like that's kind of the nub of it. there was a huge component of fear involved, and well-based fear involved in the prop 30 campaign. it seemed like it finally got through to people that a tremendous percentage of the state budget is dedicated to k-12 and higher education and you can only cut so far, and we had come to that point without impacting those sections of the budget. >> what i think is so fascinating, tyche, about the passage of that, is people were scared, people voted, they decided it was worth -- even though they didn't trust the legislature, it was worth giving them more money. but we've been talking in the media for the last ten years about how california is broke, there's
elbaradei. he is the former head of the international atomic energy agency and a nobel peace prize winner. . >> ifill: thank you for joinings us. you called egypt to reject the -- what's recan to how it turned out? >> it is going to pass but it's a sad day in my view for egypt because it is going to institutionalize stability, very polarizing charter, defines a lot of the basic human value like treatment woman of religion, freedom of expression, so i'm not sure that this is the way forward. however, we would have to take it from there and i think that we treat that constitution try to get another assembly to work, that is not polarizing but establish a consensus among the two divided fraction of the society. right now we have educated middle class on one camp and the so-called islamists and majority of the illiterate part on the other side. that's not the way we expected after the uprising. we need a charter that unifies people that not talking about controversial issues like role, freedom of expression, freedom of religion, freedom of worship but talk about science, technology, health
, among other things, ancient and modern lives in her adopted >> there's weirdly a lot of energy in athens, and, whether it's good or bad, there's a feeling. >> brown: what kind of energy? >> maybe there's a "there's nothing left to lose" as a kind of freedom as well. people are going out to plays. they're still going out and doing things, but, you know with less money. but there's an urgency. poetry meetings are very well literary events are packed. >> brown: why do you think that is? >> well, it's inexpensive, inexpensive entertainment. ( laughs ) but i think people want to be together. they want to be talking to people.ton >> brown: the crisis around here, she says, rarely makes it into her poetry in an explicit way. but she did have one direct hit for us, a playful work-in- progress called "austerity measures." >> i love the term "austerity measures." it sounds so poetic. >> brown: even though it's so" real, nitty-gritty in what's happening here? >> yes, i love the idea of "measures" as, you know, verse. it was prompted by a headline that i read somewhere, which w
in the state of california right now. looking at six meters. many buildings have one meter, and yet for energy efficiency and for billing purposes, it helps to separate out the meter so you know how much each space is using. there's been a big issue about the so-called submeetering. we're going to see in a little while some new sub meetering equipment. but this is a method which is cost efficient because it allows each person to get their own bill. when you get your own bill, you know you want to keep your billow. where as if the rental unit came power and you don't pay a separate electrical bill, you might not be quite as careful. >> i believe the current public utilities commission code does require all individual residential units to be individually meters. that's for all new work. >> and for commercial, they allow separate submetering. ok. so we brought the power into the building. we're watching our fingers here. we have other ways we'll seat meters >> we have examples, a wide variety of metering and service equipment that can be chosen. the reason i wanted to show you this is to show you
issue from the panama canal treaties to the energy legislation where byrd worked tirelessly on it to get it done without a filibuster. he had the sense that the senate leader should have a special relationship with the president and that is the way the system was supposed to work. of course, the most important in for the senate leader is to make the senate work. byrd knew the senate rules better than any person that ever lived. he lived in dealing with the notion of the fear of a paralyzed senate. he wanted to think that the rules worked, but he knew that in fact jim allen of alabama had cracked the code. he had figured out how to have this filibuster so the senate could be tied up in paralyzed. robert byrd like to think you have to be an expert to do this, but it turned out you do not need to be an expert at all. a couple of senators did not know the rules and they tied the senate up. byrd struggled with the notion of how to keep the unique character of the senate without having a paralyzed? in that regard, he championed rules change. he got some done in 1979. he knew that the senate ru
to make much difference. it might mean letting go of some things. >> getting the bad energy out? >> and projecting a good image of yourself. >> do you have any tricks about staying positive? >> i have a lot of faith. and goodness i see in people, it comes in many forms. i just came from queen's new york and visited a hurricane victims. but don't have any jobs they're helping their neighbors clean-air yard every saturday, exposing themselves to all kinds of things and doing at because they want to do something for their community. i am compelled to say my goodness, if these people are willing to risk their lives, what can i do to help them? >> thank you. you have given me a perfect segue. i would like to pull the thread of proposing a new idea and the possibility of getting up and running out the bad stuff. one of the things women tend to do is dismiss ourselves. we dispose of our ideas if of the pressures that come in power and say i'm sorry. could you talk about that were times when you faced that where you -- where does that come from? how would you instruct other women to not
throughout today and tonight. let's break it down. you see the low sliding off the coast. getting energy if the west. it becomes intense and stays to the south of new england. now with that flow, we're getting the winds coming from the north, picking up the moisture from the atlantic. that's why eastern massachusetts, if you can see the brighter white here, indicates a little bit more intense snowfall. it is still something we're monitoring because the as the low slides east or west, that would impacts how much rain versus how much snow you get in new england. whether you're in new england or not, you'll face some travel troubles today. we have airport delays forecast for the northeast, the mid-atlantic, the midwest. and even down here in the south, we had delays in charlotte this morning. and on the west coast, we could see delays, low clouds and rain even in los angeles. busy travel weekend. lots of weather coast to coast that will impact millions of people. >> no escaping it, huh? >> no. >> thanks. >>> tax hikes, spending cuts, and the u.s. economy caught right in the middle. we can o
. plus it'll save you a little bit of energy if anyone forgets to turn off the fan. for ventilation in the kitchen we are going to be taking care of that by way of this oven unit. this is going to go in over the stove and hooks into some ductwork that we had the heating guys install for us. it sucks in the air from the bottom and spits it out outside. that's in addition to some very high- tech, high-speed cooking that this is going to do. but we're going to wait on installing this baby until our full-height backsplashes are all installed. those were all cut and polished at the same place that we saw the countertops being fabricated last time with some very precise, computerized tools. >>: we have a park fusion saw/waterjet combination. what we're able to do is set that up on the machine and do all the straight cutting with the saw portion. and then do some intricate cutting with the waterjet. so we've taken 2 machines, put it in together as 1. you can use the high yield and nesting to get a good deal for your material. >>miriam: so now that all your cuts are done, what's next? >>: s
're away from home. adjust your thermostat remotely to help save energy and money. turn on the lights, even see that everyone is safe and secure. and with adt, you can rely on our fast response monitoring for 24/7 protection against burglary, fire, and high levels of carbon monoxide. the adt new year's sale. it could help you save something more important than money. call now to save $300 on adt starting at $99 installed plus 15% off accessories. sale ends midnight january 2nd. >>> top stories now. new york city police are searching for a woman this morning after a man was pushed to his death on a subway platform. witnesses say a woman was pacing that platform and mumble to herself. this is the second time in a month someone has been shoved in front of a train. >>> los angeles police probably did not expect to see this at a gun buyback program. "the l.a. times" reports that at least one rocket launcher was among the thousands of firearms turned in. no word whether the launcher was real, but the buyback program broke records. >>> and in money, banks setting records this year but not in a goo
sensible men and women if it is to prosper. it need the energy jiss of the creative imagination as expressed in the arts. it is crucial to the lives of all of our citizens as it is to all human beings at all times that they encounter a world that posseses a trance send nt meaning in which the human experience makes sense. nothing is more dehume nicing, more certain to generate a crisis than to experience one's life as a meaningless event in a meaningless world. we may be approaching what is for our nation unexplored and unperilous territory. europe is experiencing that and the results are not attractive. it seems that when a majority of people internalize the big bang theory and ask with peggy lee is that all there is, when many people decide the universe is the result of a cosmic sneeze with no meaning, when they conclude that therefore life should be filled, overflowing with distractions, comforts and entertainments to aswage the board m, then they may become suss september bling to the excitements of politics that promise ar sets meaning and spures al vations of a human condi
commerce secretary, your energy secretary. so he relied on sort of the people just around him. i think this administration and the president should do a better job of getting his cabinet out there, because, frankly, most americans don't even know who the rest of the cabinet members are. >> finer point on it, roland. do you think the president is sending a message that he won't fight for his nominees? >> well, i think what he's doing is, he's picking and choosing his battles, but he needs to understand, the last four years, republicans fought him on everything. he should send the signal, i'm not going to play the games we played the last four years. i'm going to be very aggressive, and if you want to deny me my choice, then you should vote that person down. he should have put her forward, and look, if he wants former senator chuck hagel, put him forward as well, and tell the senate, i dare you to do it. >> alice, that brings up an interesting point. tom friedman wrote an op-ed in "the new york times" today, defending chuck hagel. i want to read a portion of it. he says, "hagel is out of
melissa hart said, and very importantly acknowledge the leadership in terms of the energy she brought to the white center, this lecture was her brainchild. the constitution of the activities were brainchild, and recognizing that under the board of regents, the chase award given from the president's office given to melissa hard for her work in community service. so i want to acknowledge mullah so hard. [applause] -- melissa hart. >> and finally, all of you make such a difference to us. when i think about what makes a successful of the law school, having a diverse, inclusive and collaborative community about standing -- outstanding students, faculty, alumni, and friends, gives us -- the members here come and there are several, very supportive a lawns, professors, this community can come together and really make a difference. and you all matter in so many ways, so want to thank all of you. i can't name you all, but you really help make us successful. now, when justice ginsburg agreed to, she said don't want to give a lecture, but i would like a fireside chat. and i said that would be lov
to the bathrooms which is a good thing. but it can be very cold, and it is a lot of fun. such great energy. people come from all over the world. >> meantime, i'm carl quintanilla along with erica hill. lester has the morning off. >>> coming up this morning, we'll look at 25 years of "weekend today." >> we celebrated that silver anniversary this year. we'll share the big stories from that quarter century and hear from some of the people you've shared your weekends with over that time. >>> plus, ever wonder what happens to those christmas presents that you take back to the store? most aren't just put back on the shelf. we're going to show you one place where holiday returns are big business. >>> plus, a little later, love and romance on ice. we're going to take you to the iconic new york location just outside our studios where many men pop the question. that may look familiar to you. >> kind of gives it away. >> a little bit. >>> and we'll begin this half-hour, though, with a love story 25 years in the making. it all started when a sixth grade boy wrote a letter to a classmate who was then the apple
consequence. she's apparently to be head of a energy company that wants favors from epa or princeton. it's more important. we got legal proceedings to stop this massive economic dislocation. hopefully these candid discussions in the name of a false identity will shed light on that case. >> kelly: chris, we thank you for joining us and discussing this case that you're now pursuing. >> thank you. >> eric: coming up, the two things you'll need to know for new year's. great easy cocktails and a hangover cure you can find in the fridge. >> kelly: let's check in with gregg jarrett for what's coming up at the top of the hour. >> it's not my fridge. president obama set to meet today with house and senate leadership to make one more attempt to avoid going over the cliff. one prominent senator says hey, this meeting feels more like optics than anything real. are we skeptical? we'll have a fair and balanced debate. are dozens of law schools guilty of legal ethics violations? not mine. legal panel is here to weigh in on that in "america's newsroom" [ malennouncer ] it's tt time of year again. time f
was an engineer with a passion to try a lot of new stuff and i have a lot of energy. i hired people because i could not do myself what i wanted to do, and so i had employees. and i respected the work that they did because i gave them good salaries and the very best dental and health insurance, better than lockheed. and i never thought that i was there to grow a business or to make a profit. in fact, the number one thing -- and i always said that even to those who held stock in my company -- the number one thing, the biggest priority for my employees was to have fun. i enjoyed the accomplishment of breakthroughs and the fun of a first applied. and everyone who worked for me deserved to have that enjoyment. the second priority was the families of the employees have fun. that is why we provided good salaries and good health care and so on. the third priority, no cutting to make a profit. it is tough to say that to a stockholder or a board member. but every company i have ever seen go bankrupt, they started having fun -- they stop having fun before that. when people have fun, they will work like.
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)